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Animals
Where is the animal shelter?
I want to adopt a pet (dogs, cats & rabbits).
I want to give away my dog or cat (for adoption).
I have lost my pet.
I have a sick or injured pet.
Where can I get my pet spayed or neutered?
I have been bitten by an animal.
Tell me about rabies.
Are there regulations on the maximum permissible number of pets?
I want a dead animal removed.
I want to volunteer to work with animals.
Where do I get a license for my dog / cat?
Where are the dog parks?
What are the leash laws?
I have a problem with rats & other pests.
I have a problem with bees.
I have a dangerous animal, snake on my property.
I want to report a stray dog / cat.
I want to report an abused pet.
I have a stray cat.
I have a problem with barking dogs.
Where do I get a hunting license?
Where is the animal shelter?
 
 

Where is the animal shelter?
Inland Valley Humane Society

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org

I want to adopt a pet (dogs, cats & rabbits).
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org

I want to give away my dog or cat (for adoption).
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org

I have lost my pet.
It is very important that you personally visit the animal shelter that services your city or area. Then visit other shelters nearby (see PDF file below). When you arrive at the shelter, be certain to ask to see all of the found animals, including found animals that are being held in the hospital or observation wards. Ask about any injured animals that may have been taken to a private veterinarian or that were picked up sadly, dead off the street.

Each County Animal Shelter has a lost and found bulletin board for posting information about lost pets. In addition, shelter staff and shelter volunteers work hard at trying to match up lost pets with their owners.

Montclair's local animal shelter is:

Inland Valley Humane Society

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

http://www.ivhsspca.org

See PDF file below for listing of all local animal shelters

View PDF

I have a sick or injured pet.
Contact your local veterinarian or the Inland Valley Humane Society at:

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org

Where can I get my pet spayed or neutered?
Contact your private veterinarian or the low-cost spay/neuter clinic at the Inland Valley Humane Society. 

Inland Valley Humane Society

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

http://www.ivhsspca.org/vetservices.html

I have been bitten by an animal.
You should seek medical attention immediately for any animal bite.

Tell me about rabies.

Rabies is a preventable viral disease of mammals most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal. The vast majority of rabies cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) each year occur in wild animals like raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes. Domestic animals account for less than 10% of the reported rabies cases, with cats, cattle, and dogs most often reported rabid.

Rabies virus infects the central nervous system, causing encephalopathy and ultimately death. Early symptoms of rabies in humans are nonspecific, consisting of fever, headache, and general malaise. As the disease progresses, neurological symptoms appear and may include insomnia, anxiety, confusion, slight or partial paralysis, excitation, hallucinations, agitation, hypersalivation, difficulty swallowing, and hydrophobia (fear of water). Death usually occurs within days of the onset of symptoms.

Public health importance of rabies

Over the last 100 years, rabies in the United States has changed dramatically. More than 90% of all animal cases reported annually to CDC now occur in wildlife;  before 1960 the majority were in domestic animals. The principal rabies hosts today are wild carnivores and bats. The number of rabies-related human deaths in the United States has declined from more than 100 annually at the turn of the century to one or two per year in the 1990's.  Modern day prophylaxis has proven nearly 100% successful. In the United States, human fatalities associated with rabies occur in people who fail to seek medical assistance, usually because they were unaware of their exposure.

Cost of rabies prevention

Although human rabies deaths are rare, the estimated public health costs associated with disease detection, prevention, and control have risen, exceeding $300 million annually. These costs include the vaccination of companion animals, animal control programs, maintenance of rabies laboratories, and medical costs, such as those incurred for rabies postexposure prophylaxis (PEP).

Accurate estimates of these expenditures are not available. Although the number of PEPs given in the United States each year is unknown, it is estimated to be about 40,000. When rabies becomes epizootic or enzootic in a region, the number of PEPs in that area increases. Although the cost varies, a course of rabies immune globulin and five doses of vaccine given over a 4-week period typically exceeds $1,000. The cost per human life saved from rabies ranges from approximately $10,000 to $100 million, depending on the nature of the exposure and the probability of rabies in a region.

The cost of rabies worldwide

Customarily, the level of international resources committed to the control of an infectious disease is a response to the associated human morbidity and mortality. For most infectious diseases, these data adequately reflect the deserved public health attention. It is difficult, however, to estimate the global impact of rabies by using only human mortality data. Because vaccines to prevent human rabies have been available for more than 100 years, most deaths from rabies occur in countries with inadequate public health resources and limited access to preventive treatment. These countries also have few diagnostic facilities and almost no rabies surveillance.

Underreporting is a characteristic of almost every infectious disease in developing countries, and increasing the estimated human mortality does not in itself increase the relative public health importance of rabies. There is, however, one often neglected aspect of rabies that does affect perception of its importance. Rabies is not, in the natural sense, a disease of humans. Human infection is incidental to the reservoir of disease in wild and domestic animals; therefore, a more accurate projection of the impact of rabies on public health should include an estimate of the extent to which the animal population is affected and the expense involved in preventing transmission of rabies from animals to humans.

An additional figure is needed to complete the global picture of rabies. The best estimates of the impact of rabies on a country and the public health resources available within that country for rabies control are found in data for the number and distribution of cases of rabies in domestic animals. Despite evidence that control of dog rabies through programs of animal vaccination and elimination of stray dogs can reduce the incidence of human rabies, exposure to rabid dogs is still the cause of over 90% of human exposures to rabies and of over 99% of human deaths worldwide. The cost of these programs prohibits their full implementation in much of the developing world, and in even the most prosperous countries the cost of an effective dog rabies control program is a drain on public health resources. The estimated annual expenditure for rabies prevention in the United States is over US $300 million, most of which is spent on dog vaccinations. An annual turnover of approximately 25% in the dog population necessitates revaccination of millions of animals each year, and reintroduction of rabies through transport of infected animals from outside a controlled area is always a possibility should control programs lapse. Reservoirs of wildlife rabies, virtually unknown in Asia and tropical regions, are also potential sources of rabies infection for dogs in Europe and North America.

For more detailed information on the economic effects of rabies, see:

     Fishbein, D.B., Miranda, N.J., Merrill, P., Camba, R.A., Meltzer, M., Carlos, E.T., Bautista, C. F., Sopungco, P.V., Mangahas, L.C., Hernandez, L.M., Leoncio, M.M., Mercado, D., Gregorio, S., Salva, E., Dobbins, J.G., & Winkler, W.G. (1991). Rabies control in the Republic of the Philippines: benefits and costs of elimination. Vaccine,9, 581-588.

     Uhaa, I.J., Dato, V.M., Sorhage, F.E., Beckley, J.W., Roscoe, D.E., Gorsky, R.D., & Fishbein, D.B. (1992). Benefits and costs of using an orally absorbed vaccine to control rabies in raccoons. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 201(12), 1873-1882.

     Meltzer, M.I. & Rupprecht, C.E. (1998). A review of the economics of the prevention and control of rabies -- Part 1: global impact and rabies in humans. Pharmacoeconomics, 14(4), 365-383.

     Meltzer, M.I. & Rupprecht, C.E. (1998). A review of the economics of the prevention and control of rabies -- Part 2: rabies in dogs, livestock and wildlife. Pharmacoeconomics, 14(5), 481-498.

     Meltzer, M.I. (1996). Assessing the costs and benefits of an oral vaccine for raccoon rabies: a possible model. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2, 343-349.

Information courtesy of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention

For more information, see the following link:

 

 

www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/rabies/Ques&Ans/q&a.htm

Are there regulations on the maximum permissible number of pets?
Yes. Please refer to the Montclair Municipal Code, 11.18.030 - Uses permitted, Section C, 1-5 (see attached link)

http://ordlink.com/codes/montclair/index.htm

I want a dead animal removed.
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society at:

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1.yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org/

I want to volunteer to work with animals.
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society at:

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org/volunteers.html

Where do I get a license for my dog / cat?
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society at:

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org

Where are the dog parks?
Southern California Dog Parks
These parks are fenced areas open only to dogs and their owners. Dogs are allowed to be "off-leash" and can run freely. Most dogs enjoy playing with each other and there are very few disagreements. Owners are expected to clean up after their own dogs. It is recommended to bring a water dish and water to some parks. It not recommended to bring small children.

Chino - Prado Regional Park. 1,100 acres of dog park. Dog training park. (909) 597-6366.

Claremont - College Park "Bark Park."  From the 10 Freeway, exit at Indian Hill Blvd.  North on Indian Hill to Arrow Highway.  East (right) on Arrow to College Avenue.  North (left) on College three blocks - the park is on your right just before the Metrolink tracks (Claremont Colleges area).

Corona - Corona Dog Park. .85 acre that is fenced in. There is no separate area for small dogs. The drinking fountain is on the outside of the park so it's best to bring water with you. There are three benches and trash cans inside the park. Doggie clean up bags are located within the sallyport. Location: On Butterfield Drive in the Butterfield Stage Trail Park-right across from the entrance to Corona Airport. Directions: 91 freeway to Lincoln, go North. At Railroad Street make a left and then a right at Smith Street. Make a left at Butterfield Drive and the dog park is on the left hand side about 3/4 mile down next to the main parking lot for Butterfield Park.

Costa Mesa - At the end of Arlington Boulevard just off Fairview Street, across from the Orange County Fair. Large park with trees and grass. Closes promptly at dusk. Closed on Wednesdays.

Laguna Beach - Approximately 1/2 way down Laguna Canyon Road on the east side of the highway. Next to the highway, not near hills or beach.

Hollywood - On Mulholland Drive just off Laurel Canyon. Lots of trees and grass. Huge park with view of Hollywood Hills and canyon below. Only open after 3:00 p.m.

Huntington Beach - On Edwards Street between Slater and Pacific Coast Highway. Fairly new park. Nearby horseback riding trail.

Long Beach - On 7th Street just northwest of Pacific Coast Highway.
Nice park with grass and trees. Only park open at night, as late as 10:00 p.m.

Redondo Beach  - 190th and Flagler. No view, few trees and grass.

Southern California Dog Beaches

Huntington Beach - On Pacific Coast Highway, just east of Goldenwest Street. Dogs can be off the leash at the water line. Not too busy.

San Diego - 8 Fwy. Exit at "Sea Cliffs." Turn left. Turn right at next light. Residential area, go to end. Very busy. Smooth waves break quite a ways off shore.

What are the leash laws?
Montclair Municipal Code 5.08.030 states:

Dogs at large.

  1. It is unlawful for any person owning or having the charge, care, custody or control of any dog to cause, permit or allow such dog to be or to run at large upon any highway, street, lane, alley, court, or other public place in the City or upon any private property or premises other than those of the person owning or having the charge, care, custody or control of such dog unless such dog shall be restrained by a substantial chain or leash not exceeding 6 feet in length and is in the charge, care, custody and control of a competent person.

  2. The provisions of this section shall not prohibit permitting or allowing dogs to run at large on the premises of the owner or person having the charge, care, custody or control of such dogs, or prohibit permitting or allowing dogs, other than unspayed female dogs during the copulating season, to run at large on any ranch or undeveloped property where, within a radius of 500 feet therefrom, there shall be situated not more than five residential or commercial establishments other than the residence of the person owning or having the charge, care, custody or control of such dogs. (Ord. 99-791 Exh. A (part); prior code 6-1.04)

http://ordlink.com/codes/montclair/index.htm

I have a problem with rats & other pests.
Contact the West Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District at (909) 627-0931.

http://www.wvmosquito.org/

I have a problem with bees.
If this is an emergency dial 9-1-1.  For non-emergency situations or questions you can contact West Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District at (909) 627-0931.

http://www.wvmosquito.org

I have a dangerous animal, snake on my property.
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society at:

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org

I want to report a stray dog / cat.
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society at:

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org

I want to report an abused pet.
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society at:

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org/

I have a stray cat.
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society at:

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org

I have a problem with barking dogs.
Contact the Inland Valley Humane Society at:

500 Humane Way, Pomona, California, 91766
Phone: (909) 623-9777
Fax: (909) 623-0432
E-mail: ivhs1@yahoo.com

24-Hour Emergency Line: (909) 594-9858

Business Office Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Kennel Hours

Monday and Tuesday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday:
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday:
10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

http://www.ivhsspca.org/

Where do I get a hunting license?
You can purchase a hunting license at many of your local sporting good stores, i.e. Sportsmart, Big 5, Turners.  In addtion, you can contact the California Department of Fish and Game.  (See attached link)

http://www.dfg.ca.gov/licensing/hunting/hunting.html

Where is the animal shelter?
The City of Montclair contracts with the Inland Valley Humane Society for animal control services.  IVHS operates a shelter at 500 Humane Way (at Mission Boulevard, Pomona.  The shelter can be reached at (909) 623-9777.


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